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While continuing our walk through the corridors of the National Gallery of Modern Art, we are often mesmerised by the rich tapestry of artworks it offers.

Village Family (Sailoz Mukherjee)

 

Head Study (S Bakre)

 

Nude (K H Ara)

 

Practice Session (Krishen Khanna)

 

Landscape (Ram Kumar)

 

Old Man and the Bird (B C Sanyal)

 

Untitled (Satish Gujral)

 

Thorn (N S Bendre)

 

Shakti (Chintamoni Kar)

 

Sea Creatures (Jaya Appaswamy)

 

A sculpture in the lawns

The photographic skills of yours truly suffer from severe limitations. Hence the poor quality of the visual representation attempted here.

The artworks are well-lit, save and except the fact that the lighting arrangements often interfere with one’s endeavours to capture some of the artworks on one’s camera. This is especially so when art works happen to be protected with a sheet of transparent glass.

In fact, this remains an issue with most of the art galleries elsewhere too. Perhaps, museum curators and architects in general need to be sensitized to this simple need of a lay viewer while soaking in and wanting to capture images of national treasures of an artistic nature.

(Related Posts:

https://ashokbhatia.wordpress.com/2018/05/06/a-walk-through-the-national-gallery-of-modern-art-in-new-delhi-india-part-1

https://ashokbhatia.wordpress.com/2018/05/08/a-walk-through-the-national-gallery-of-modern-art-in-new-delhi-india-part-2-of-3)

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With 12,000 square meters of exhibition space, the Delhi branch of the National Gallery of Modern Art is one of the world’s largest modern art museums.

A walk down its corridors makes one marvel at the attention to detail and the sheer depth of talent showcased at the gallery. When the walk is aided and guided by a guy who is an enthusiastic art lover and a dynamic person, many of the artworks on display spring to life and touch the viewer’s soul.

Portrait of HH Bhagavat Singhjee of Gondal (Gujarat)

 

Toilet (Heman Majumdar)

 

Mahishasura Mardini (Dipen Bose)

 

Toilet (G C Bhatt)

 

Divine Flame (S L Haldankar)

 

Self Portrait (Amrita Sher Gil)

 

Self Portrait (Amrita Sher Gil)

 

Notre Dame (Amrita Sher Gil)

 

Young Girls (Amrita Sher Gil)

 

Study of a Model (Amrita Sher Gil)

 

The Ancient Storyteller (Amrita Sher Gil)

 

Three Pujarins (Jamini Roy)

 

Christ and a Boy (Jamini Roy)

 

Shiva and Sati (Nandlal Bose)

(Continued….)

(Related Posts: 

https://ashokbhatia.wordpress.com/2018/05/06/a-walk-through-the-national-gallery-of-modern-art-in-new-delhi-india-part-1

https://ashokbhatia.wordpress.com/2018/05/10/a-walk-through-the-national-gallery-of-modern-art-in-new-delhi-india-part-3-of-3)

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The National Gallery of Modern Art boasts of a collection of more than 14,000 works. The permanent collection, ‘In the seeds of time…’ has art objects tracing the life and times of the country during the 18th and the 19th century.

Its exquisite collection comprises miniature paintings, East India Company paintings, including works by such artists such as Thomas Deniell, Raja Ravi Varma, Rabindranath Tagore, Jamini Roy, Amrita Sher Gil and the like. It has several sculptures by various artists.

Banaras – Manikarnika Ghat (Thomas Deniell)

 

Mosque (Thomas Denille)

 

Dancers (Tilly Kettle)

 

Calcutta (Marshal Claxtion)

 

Lord Ronaldshey (G F Watt)

 

A Woman holding a Fruit (Raja Ravi Varma)

 

Girl holding Hooka and Broom (Raja Ravi Varma)

 

Portrait of a Gentleman (Raja Ravi Varma)

 

Lady Illiot (Haris Bert)

 

Portrait of a Parsi Girl (M F Pithawala)

 

Miss Clerk (M F Pithawala)

 

Malan, Female Gardener (M F Pithawala)

 

Miss William (M F Pithawala)

 

Saraswati (Chitragara Krishnappa)

 

Lakshmi (Chitragara Krishnappa)

 

Bal Krishna (Unknown artist, Tanjore painting)

 

(Continued….)

(Related Posts:

https://ashokbhatia.wordpress.com/2018/05/08/a-walk-through-the-national-gallery-of-modern-art-in-new-delhi-india-part-2-of-3 

https://ashokbhatia.wordpress.com/2018/05/10/a-walk-through-the-national-gallery-of-modern-art-in-new-delhi-india-part-3-of-3)

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You are the main engine of economic growth,

Making global MNCs continue to fuss over you;

Splurging on goodies, traveling all over the world,

Your hard work yielding fruits which are your due.

 

You work very hard to secure a better future,

For yourself, for your progeny, and for your kith and kin;

The joint family system you appear to have given up,

Bringing up kids amidst the social media din.

 

You are the upholder of values and character,

Quietly paying your taxes, fulfilling social commitments;

A God-fearing and law-abiding citizen of the country,

Balancing a scientific outlook with superstitious predicaments.

 

Great sacrifices you are also willing to make,

When making India stronger is your belief and view;

You do not mind spending hours in a queue,

Retrieving hard-earned cash which is due to you.

 

Government subsidies you are willing to give up,

So the poor and the needy may live a better life;

You live the life of a silent but true patriot,

Ignoring social unrest, mobocracy and strife.

 

Corruption in high places you do not like,

Petty bribes which save you time you do not mind;

Inefficient delivery of public services you hate,

To trains and buses running late you are often kind.

 

But much like the three monkeys of the Mahatma,

Unpleasant things you do not hear;

You remain blind and muke to many a thing,

Indignities which do not touch you directly, silently you bear.

 

You remain faithful to the concept of democracy,

Keeping the flame of our independence aglow;

Pushing the Indian nation on its path of glory,

Hoping for a better tomorrow, even if the progress is slow.

 

Perhaps a day would dawn when you would speak up,

Push also for social, judicial and political reforms;

Chasing not only GDP and per capita income numbers,

But also Gross National Happiness in its myriad forms.

 

Strive for India to excel in its Millennium Development Goals,

Contribute towards building up Gross National Character;

Refuse to let caste and religion determine vote banks,

Of the unfolding Indian drama, be the outspoken main actor.

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ashokbhatia

The conscientious ones amongst the mandarins in the Indian Health Ministry cannot really be blamed for having sleepless nights. The epidemic of such lifestyle diseases as obesity, diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular abnormalities is leaving them a wee bit clueless. The need of the hour is to come up with a scheme which nudges Indians of all sizes and shapes to start living slimmer and healthier lives.

Take obesity, for instance. As many as 60 million Indians – roughly 5% of the population – are considered obese. With more than 50 millionObesity image suffering from high blood sugar, India is a nation headed for a health tsunami the devastation caused by which would be anything but sweet. This is a grave threat to our vision of the country reaping a hefty demographic dividend in the years to come.

How do we motivate the Indian couch potatoes to switch off their TV sets…

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Here is an inspiring narrative covering the Milk Revolution of India. When innovation meets conviction and guts, the society benefits.

In case you wish to read a brief on Amul, here is yet another utterly butterly delicious post that you may like:

http://life11.org/2015/05/08/amul-indias-beloved-brand.

Enjoy!

A Writer's Notebook.

Amul has instant recall in our minds – images of the cute Amul moppet girl, their priceless topical ads, Amul butter, Amul milk, Taste of India, all come instantly to our notice. We don’t quite realize the story within which would have images of – Dr. Verghese Kurien, White Revolution, Operation Flood, NDDB, GCMMF, milk co-operative movement, milk movie Manthan, etc.

The book (I too had a dream) is less of an autobiography – fleeting personal details are mentioned – but it is a great narrative of India’s milk revolution. From a country struggling with milk production and per capita consumption, a great journey has been covered wherein we are now the second largest milk producers in the world and have significantly improved on consumption per capita as well.

Dr. Kurien has set the narrative but it has been scribed by Ms. Gouri Salvi. It provides great insight into India’s…

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When members of the next generation of a family, born in First World countries like Norway and Switzerland, visit their roots in a Third World country like India, the poor souls are left clueless at times. Often, much hilarity ensues, as they try to cope with the realities of day-to-day life in such a delightful country as ours.

The best countries to be born in

Some time back, The Economic Intelligence Unit had compiled an index onEU Flag image the best places to be born in 2013. As many as 80 countries had been ranked on a scale of 0 to 10, with 10 standing for ideal living conditions. The rank took into account 11 indicators, like crime, trust in public institutions, health infrastructure, family life, besides fixed factors such as geography.

As per this reckoning, Switzerland was at the top, scoring 8.22. Norway was ranked number 3, scoring 8.09. Amongst the top 10 were not only Sweden (rank 4, score 8.02), Denmark (rank 5, score 8.01) and Netherlands (rank 8, score 7.94), but also Australia (rank 2, score 8.12), Singapore (rank 6, score 8.00), New Zealand (rank 7, score 7.95), Canada (rank 9, score 7.81) and Hong Kong (rank 10, score 7.80). Incidentally, India was then ranked 66, with a score of 5.67.

Hard core patriots in India may derive some comfort from the fact that Russia was ranked at 72 (score 5.54), Pakistan at 75 (score 5.17) and Bangladesh at 77 (score 5.07).

The side effects of a visit to India

What do such kids discover when they visit their roots in India?

First off, there are objects which invite wonderment.

A ceiling fan sounds like an alien object. A manually driven rickshaw is looked The horse carriages I saw in the museum were larger, grander version of this cycle rickshaw.at with unmasked curiosity. An auto rickshaw evokes a sense of novelty. A horse-driven Tonga comes in for ardent admiration. A bullock-cart gets viewed with wide-eyed wonder.

Insects and reptiles like cockroaches, lizards, ants, spiders, snails and worms of all sizes and shapes come in for close scrutiny. So do creatures of all kinds, whether bovine or porcine, especially when found exercising their democratic rights on Indian roads. Flying objects – whether unidentifiable or otherwise – get looked up to with a sense of awe and respect. Squirrels and chameleons generate much merriment.

A splash in the tropical rains uplifts the tender souls. Jumps into puddles on

Lakshmi

Lakshmi

the streets generate much excitement. The seagulls flapping about their sonorous wings leave them mesmerized. The wavering reflection of a pale yellow uprising moon on the pristine waters of the Bay of Bengal makes them attain a heavenly bliss.

Kolams outside homes arouse their curiosity. A classical dance performance leaves them spell-bound. Depending upon their own areas of interest, a keen desire to learn some form of fine art or a cultural activity gets enshrined.

An encounter with Lakshmi, the famous temple elephant of Pondicherry, invigorates them no end. A dip in the sea comes about as a blissful experience. A visit to the Planetarium and the Science Centre proves to be highly instructive.

The Incredible India

Then there are things which invoke ridicule and pity.

A power cut which disrupts a Tom and Jerry show on TV invites a stridentPGW Tom and Jerry protest and needs to be explained. When a beggar gets sighted, or when the vehicle passes a hut by the road side, the parents get called upon to explain the rationale of peaceful co-existence of the ‘haves’ and the ‘have-nots’ of Indian society.

The absence of dustbins ready to receive the wrapper of a chocolate arouses curiosity. The garbage, as well as the generally poor civic sense, invites an adverse comment. Smelly trains and railway stations get negative rankings.

The absence of courtesy and discipline on the roads and the density of vehiclesKrishna_Arjuna_Gita on our roads, all come in for sharp criticism. To ensure parking space near a favourite ice cream joint, divine intervention is prayed for.

Crossing a road is a trying experience. Use of public toilets, if any are available, leaves their souls in torment. A rat feasting on a dead bird lying on the road side comes across as a traumatic sight, explained with great difficulty by an accompanying adult by invoking the teachings of Lord Krishna in the Bhagavad Gita.

Within the confines of a home, unquestioned obedience on part of the juniors in the family causes some surprise and amusement. The rights of the younger ones – to decide which flavour of ice cream to have for dinner – can simply not get curtailed. This is an experience which is quite alien to their value system.

Expansion of the family nucleus

Other than feasting on Indian delicacies, the pampering by all seniors theyRamayana 1 come in contact with leaves them assured and self-confident. A sense of belongingness comes about. Stories from scriptures fascinate them. Narrations of the lives of great men and women of the country leave them awestruck.

They also end up imbibing some values of a joint family system. Sharing, caring, a sense of responsibility towards juniors and a healthy regard for the elderly gets implanted in their thought processes.

The twin advantage

This generation has a unique twin advantage – that of having a Western mind and an Eastern heart. Their analytical abilities are getting nurtured in a more scientific environment, while their hearts carry the seeds of compassion, empathy and love. From their working parent, they imbibe a sense of professionalism in whatever they do. Through their folks back home, they understand the importance of togetherness and team work.

A truly balanced human being they are apt to make. Unknown to them, they take humanity further on its path of evolution.

(Photograph of cycle rickshaw courtesy http://www.shabnamphoto.wordpress.com; link: http://shabnamphoto.com/2014/10/28/pondicherry-a-certain-sense-of-gallic-glory-gone-by)

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